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The Boat People

Once a friend asked me “What’s the difference between pizza and minorities?” The answer, to which I couldn’t notch on was “Pizza has value.” Here I’m writing about one such minority who’s lost their value on the hands of government and are facing a major humanitarian crisis. The Rohingyas.

What is Rohingya crisis?

Rohingyas are the Muslim community living in the Rakhine state of Myanmar. Due to lack of proof of origin, they are stateless and deprived of their fundamental rights. The government doesn’t recognize them as a citizen of Myanmar which is the root cause of the Rohingya crisis. Hundreds of thousand Rohingyas have been displaced and are taking shelter in neighboring countries i.e. Bangladesh(900,000+), India(40,000+), Pakistan(350,000), Nepal(1000+), Thailand(5000+), Saudi Arabia(500,000+) Malaysia(150,000). Most people have escaped through the vast sea in a small boat risking their life, hence are called the boat people.

Former UN Secretary Ban ki-Moon stated…

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162. To the student, thank you for your reminder

Late became !

Thank you.001

“I love coming to your class because you let me be me.”

That single sentence from a student made me realize what I was doing wrong and right in the classroom.

But before I go into this, let me share with you this first.

I just finished watching Chris Emdin’s powerful and thought provoking video titled “Reality Pedagogy” in which he insists teachers to first understand students, their culture and their context, and only then teach them the content.

His argument is pretty simple. Even when teachers do have sufficient content knowledge, many still lack the tools necessary to address the cultural divides that render them ineffective in teaching.

Starting right off the bat by teaching the content, teachers miss the opportunity to foster engagement and relationship with the students who come from divergent background. Teachers miss the opportunity to show the students that classroom is in fact…

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Helping hands

Mission Everest 2018

So far, I have been engaged with many projects before and after the massive earthquake hit in Nepal. Prominently hands for orphanage, elder aged home and Children rescue centers.

I was born in the country side of Nepal, where I have seen many children. They cannot go to school. Due to many reason like; the school in village are so far away to reach, parents cannot afford the tuition fees, educational materials and school uniform. The most important is that they are also not aware about the importance of education.

After observing these all things going around, I had a feeling the important of it. And I have to do something for them in whatever way which I can do with the supports from my friends around the world.

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Unequal: How Nepal’s Citizenship Laws Prevent Young Women from Achieving Their Dreams

Read my article on how my fellow friends are struggling to pursue their dreams simply because of not having citizenship.

Girls' Globe

By Bidhyalaxmi Maharjan, Women LEAD’s Communication Intern

Life has never been easy for Reni.* When her father died of cancer, she took over her family shop, but it was very difficult for her family of seven to live on the shop.  Later, when an acquaintance offered her a job at a finance company, she was more than happy to get a job that paid her 7,000 rupees, or $70, a month. But she did not get the job for one reason—she was not a Nepali citizen.

That was the first problem among hundreds of others Reni would go through following the death of her father. While Nepali fathers are able to pass citizenship to their children regardless of their wives’ nationality, Nepali mothers who are single or married to a foreign partner are not afforded the same right. Their children can then either live their life as a stateless…

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To LoveGuru: Part II

The task of my high school Loveguru was tough. Not anyone can become a Loveguru. Only an interest in love and romance doesn’t make you a Loveguru. It requires a set essential interpersonal communication skills to become a Loveguru. My high school Loveguru had a highly advanced emotional intelligence.

Firstly, she was a good listener. She was always curious to know the stories of people. She could see if someone was upset and asked her what was wrong. The other person starts saying, “I am having a very bad time with my boyfriend.” Our Loveguru eggs her on to share her love-story and she starts with “It’s a very long story.” (Even when their relations is just 3 month’s old.) She talks about where she first met him, their first date and then comes the first kiss. “We were on a date. You know, just strolling around Godawari and I was eating potato chips. He saw a tiny piece of chips stuck at the side of my lips and he came forward to brush it off. I looked at him and we kissed.” The benefit of being a Loveguru is you become privy to the secret romances of people. People trust you.

Sometimes your friend turns to Loveguru in utter distress and frustration. He says, “My babe says she is no longer interested in me. How can she say so? She’s my life. I can’t live without her.” Your friend starts freaking out and the Loveguru says, “ Calm down! Calm down! She probably didn’t mean it. May be you caught her in a bad mood. Why not try talking to her once again?” Loveguru tries to comfort her friend. But her friend can’t help freaking out. He goes on, “My life is nothing without her. You know, it’s like that of a fish without water. There’s no point in living this life. I don’t want to live anymore. I want to commit suicide.” At this moment Loveguru starts giving direct commands. “Shut up. What nonsense are you talking about? Are you stupid? Commit suicide?!! As if there are no other options.” Then your friend pleads Loveguru to do something. Loveguru now intervenes. She talks to his girlfriend and tries to convince her and work out a solution.

Here I am, unable to manage my own emotions. There, Loveguru is dealing with the emotions others feel, like a boss. She knows how to soothe an angry lover, comfort a damsel in distress, stop your friend from doing something stupid and dangerous in the heat of passion. Loveguru knows wide range of tactics to manage emotions in others. She knows how to influence emotions others are feeling.

Finally, we all know how complex human relations can be. Probably many of us here have ‘It’s complicated’ as our relationship status on Facebook. Today you think you and your beloved are the happiest couple on the earth but tomorrow you feel there’s something terribly wrong between you two. You feel your lover’s personality doesn’t match with yours. My Loveguru used to say, “I don’t think the relation of X with Y isn’t going to last long. X is so bubbly person but when she is with Y she acts differently. She doesn’t look real.” Human relations are a maze with its all intricacies. The relations of teenaged years can especially be more unstable. Loveguru is capable of understanding such complexities, which helps them to give good advices to their friends.

I thought all these self-proclaimed Lovegurus belittled the greatness of Love by acting as if they knew everything about it. But I was wrong. They might not know everything but they were just trying to help their friends enjoy love. They were helping their friends to stay in a healthy relationship. Our love and relations can seem like a confusing puzzle to us and when we have a Loveguru we can make sense of it. We all need a Loveguru.